New Year, New Site

Happy 2021, folks! My website upgrade is complete. Along with a fresh new look, I’ve also made my Content Warnings page easier to access in the site menu and finally added some SSL (whatever that is) to my site to make it secure for your browsing safety. I may still be tweaking some things to add and alter some functions on the admin end, which, in my past experience with WordPress, may very well result in some site downtime, but everything on the user end is all new and shiny for everyone to enjoy otherwise.

I’m also setting for myself a goal to get more engaged in this space for both your edification and for SEO reasons. I know I say that every time my site needs an update, but we’re still locked in the pandemic and I currently have an abundance of time and a restless energy to do something. I’m thinking along the lines of essays, because I’ve been playing a lot of video games and have THOUGHTS about them. If that sounds interesting to you, of course, I already do my video game podcast Grumble Pak with my friend and roommate Eli Wennstrom, and we’ve got a number of episodes available already for your listening enjoyment. Another thing that resulted from Pandemic Gotta Do Something Syndrome.

Regardless of how well I stick to this New Year’s Resolution, of course, this will continue to be the landing page for news and information regarding my writing career, including book links, publication news, upcoming events, and whatever else is relevant to my published works. My freelance editor site is still up, as well, with all the details and rates for the editorial services I provide: consultation, developmental editing, copyediting, proofreading, and now also sensitivity reading for portrayals of genderfluid, aromantic, and asexual characters.

Anyway, that’s all I have now for the sexy new Jasmine Gower Dot Com. As usual, keep eyes on this space (or my Twitter, which is really the only social media site I use with any amount of regularity anymore) for more updates and content in this new year.

Website Update for 2021

Hi all. To celebrate the sending off of 2020, I’m going to be updating this site for the new year. More or less, all of the same information should still be here, but there will be a fresh new look.

Also, apologies to anyone who might have tried to contact me via the site contact form here lately. Managing spam bots through that has been a pain and half, so I’ve more of less abandoned it to the wolves. With the updated layout, I’m hoping to adjust my contact methods to ensure that only non-robots are able to reach out to me.

Anyway, things may be a little up-and-down here as I do some virtual construction. Thanks in advance for the patience, and I can still be contacted readily over on Twitter in the meantime.

Happy New Year!

Upcoming Event: Weeknight Writers Virtual Conference (Updated 9/23)

a cup of tea sitting on a book in the foreground of autumn leaves
Photo: Autumn background with a book, a Cup of tea and leaves on the background of blurred autumn trees (Flip 2019) by Marco Verch under Creative Commons 2.0

UPDATE: the Exploring Romance through SFF panel has been canceled, but I’ll still be on the panels for Writing with Anxiety and Writing with Depression. Please be sure to register (for free!) on the Weeknight Writers Virtual Conference site ahead of time if you plan on attending.

 

Another virtual event is on the horizon! While I’m staying safe inside during this very smoky time in Oregon, I’m preparing to join the Weeknight Writers Virtual Conference as a panelist. The conference is free to participate in and will take place on Saturday September 26th and Sunday September 27th. If you are interested in joining, please be sure to register for the virtual calls on the Weeknight Writers Virtual Conference website.

I’ll be on the panels Writing with Anxiety, Exploring Romance through SFF, and Writing with Depression. Exact dates and times are listed on the conference website, as well as my Upcoming Events page. Be sure to keep an eye on timezone differences, as the conference site lists panels in Eastern Time.

I hope you can join to chat with me and other authors about romance in sci-fi/fantasy and navigating mental health while writing. Until then, if you’re physically on the Pacific coast like me, stay safe among all the fires and smoke.

2020 Nebula Conference Online Reading Series

Jasmine Gower speaking at the University Bookstore in Seattle

My SFWA reading that was originally scheduled for April is back on! Sort of!

For those who have 2020 Nebula Conference membership, on Wednesday, August 26th at 5:00 PM PDT, Corry L. Lee and I will be digitally joining the Reading Series for the 2020 Nebula Conference Online, where we will be reading from our works and doing a Q&A afterward. I’m planning on reading a few scenes from Moonshine, as well as a scene from my new (not yet sold) dark fantasy project.

Details about the reading can be found on the Nebula Conference site.

Now Available: Episode 1 of Grumble Pak

Grumble Pak logo; red text over bright 1990's style geometric patterns

UPDATE: the Grumble Pak page has been updated with the links to all of the podcast distributors that host us.

Hello! Thanks to these quarantined times, I’ve gotten into podcasting! Join my friend/roommate Elijah Wennstrom and I for Grumble Pak, a podcast where we talk about various video game topics and old/weird games that we’ve both played. Our first episode launches today on the topic of, wouldn’t you know it, the Rumble Pak (and other weird video game peripherals). New episodes will post every other Tuesday.

You can listen to Episode 1 – Peripherals on Spotify now.

You can follow our Twitter @GrumblePakPod.

[UPDATED] Upcoming Event: SFWA NW Reader Series

UPDATE – MARCH 12, 2020

Both of these readings have been canceled due to COVID-19 concerns. While disappointing, I’m glad that SFWA is considering public health and safety in this decision, and there is a possibility that it will be rescheduled for later in the year when things are less pandemic-y.

As always, I will update here on my site if and when I have any new information about upcoming events. In the meantime, please be sure to wash your hands with soap regularly and channel your inner vampire when coughing and sneezing.


Exciting news for those in the Pacific Northwest: I’ll be joining the SFWA Northwest Reader Series in April, along with Corey L. Lee and Carolyn O’Doherty! The three of us will be reading in Seattle and Portland on April 28th and April 30th, respectively. These events are free to the public and in addition to the readings from each of us will also include a Q&A, signings, and a chance to purchase our books.

If you’re interested in attending, it would be a big help to SFWA (for headcount reasons) if you register for the events on Eventbrite. Here is the Seattle page, and here is the Portland one.

A big thanks to the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America for inviting me to be a part of this event! I can’t wait to see everyone there!

SLIGHT UPDATE: I completely forgot to add the details to my Upcoming Events page when I posted this originally, but all that information is now collected there for quick and easy reference.

Now Open for Business: Freelance Editorial Services

I’m happy to announce this post-NaNoWriMo season that I’ve just opened up freelance editorial services!

These services include pre-developmental consultation, developmental editing (currently limited to adult and young adult SFFH projects), copyediting, and proofreading. Details, including my rates and estimated timelines for projects, are available on my new editorial site. The link can now be found in the top menu of this site, as well.

I’m excited to get more involved in editing other people’s work again (I’ve been focused more on my own these past few months, and I could use some space away from my own words), so if you’re on the search for an editor for your novel/short story/article/website/what-have-you, please take a look at my services and contact me if you’re interested or want to know more.

Upcoming Reading at Daedalus Books

On Saturday November 23rd at 7:00 PM, I’ll be joining a group of authors at Daedalus Books in Portland for readings and signings. Please stop by to visit myself, Daniel H. Wilson, Jason Gurley, Curtis C. Chen, Benjamin Parzybok, and Arthur Smid and hear us read some selections from our works.

Daedalus Books can be found at 2074 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209. All of the details for the event can, of course, be found on my event page, as well as Daedalus’s Facebook event posting.

Flyer for book reading at Daedalus Books on November 23rd at 7:00 PM

OryCon 2019

2019 Endeavour Award Finalist badge

OryCon is coming up this weekend in Portland, OR at the Jantzen Beach Red Lion Hotel. I will be there as a panelist as well as an Endeavour Award finalist for Moonshine.

If you want to catch the panel I’m on, it will be Exploring Publishing Options on November 10th at 11:15 AM. The Endeavour Award Ceremony will be on Friday, November 8th at 6:45 PM.

I’m very excited to have Moonshine selected as a finalist for the Endeavour Award. I’ve been attending OryCon for the past two years now, and as one of the smaller conventions I’ve been to, I really enjoy it’s laid-back atmosphere and homey feel. I’m generally a very low-energy person and highly prone to sensory overload, so even though I like conventions, most of them take a lot out of me, but OryCon has proven to be the sort of the convention that’s a comfortable speed for me. Having my work recognized there is a great feeling that really makes me feel a part of the Pacific Northwest SFF community.

Check my events page for all the panel and award ceremony details, or visit the OryCon site for the full convention schedule.

Want to read my thesis?: Approaches to Contested In-Group Terminology for Mindful Editors

I’ve been so busy the past few weeks with WorldCon stuff that I completely forgot: my graduate thesis has been published to PDXScholar and is available for anyone to read.

Titled “Approaches to Contested In-Group Terminology for Mindful Editors”, I examined the question of how editors and other publishing professionals can ethically go about using respectful terminology for marginalized groups when all possible terminology is considered inappropriate by some subset or another of said marginalized group (what I refer to in the paper as “contested in-group terminology”). Specially, I took a look how publishing has approached this in the past by examining the terminology used by 90 books published over the past decade with regards to fat, disabled, and queer identities (I go in more depth as to why I chose to use those specific terms in the paper), and coded the data to find any trends in the language that’s been used.

Here’s the full abstract:

In the conversation about mindful editing, a conundrum exists with regards to marginalized groups for whom all possible labels to identify the group contain loaded histories and connotations, and different subsets of these marginalized groups are in disagreement about what terminology is most appropriate. This contested in-group terminology places editors in a position where any editorial choice they make has high risk of offending or alienated members of the very group the editor hopes to represent. How, then, do mindful editors approach the matter of contested in-group terminology in an ethical manner? This study examines the approaches to contested in-group terminology used by the publishing industry in the past decade, examining word-choice and framing in the back cover copy and titles from three datasets of books featuring characters that belong to the following identity groups: fat, disabled, and queer. The data shows that publishing has been taking different approaches to language for each of these groups and that mindful editors cannot expect one approach to navigating contested in-group terminology to translate easily to other groups. The data also reveals some areas where the publishing industry and readers are in disagreement about appropriate labels for marginalized groups. In order to address contested terminology, mindful editors need to understand the histories of the terminology in question, consider the audience and the author’s intention with their word-choice, and research arguments for or against particular word-choice from a variety of in-group sources to make well-reasoned and deliberate choices for terminology and framing.

One thing that’s not in the paper is a conversation I had with my graduate committee about my findings, in which my committee asked if I had any recommendations for how publishers can commit to specific policies regarding contested in-group terminology. My suggestion was that publishers could be more transparent about their editorial house style–most publishers already have their house styles internally documented, and it would be a simple matter of publishing that information. This would allow publishers a chance to explain why they make certain editorial choices with contested in-group terminology (since one of the big conclusions of my findings was that just being able to explain why one term is used over another is one of the most significant factors in mindful editing), as well as help de-escalate some of the contention surrounding this topic, as the contested in-group terminology would be mixed in with all of the other editorial choices included in the publisher’s house style.

Anyway, if you have a stomach for dense academic writing or have any interest in editing, go ahead and give it a read. It’s actually not terribly long (don’t let the page count fool you–I had to cite 90 books, after all, so a big portion of that is just me listing my sources), and there’s even a few colorful graphs to break up all the dense research analysis.